Dating soda bottles Denver text chat no signup

From the standpoint of most collectors of antique bottles, the name and location of the company the bottle was made for, and the name of the product that was originally contained in the bottle (one or both of which may be embossed on the bottle) is often considered to be of more interest or importance than the glass factory where the bottle was actually manufactured.However, this site is geared with more emphasis on the actual themselves.Also, only a small percentage of comments received are actually published on this site, since if every one was answered and published, my site would soon be loaded down with hundreds of comments that could possibly cause the pages to begin to load more slowly for those with slower or older computers.

dating soda bottles-67

This list primarily includes marks that represent the actual glass company that made the container.

Many marks are encountered that indicate the company whose product was contained within it, or are trademarks (“brand names”) that give no indication of who actually made the glass, and those are (with quite a few exceptions) , not included in my list.

For the most part, I have not attempted to list fine distinctions for marks that are found both with and without periods. See my webpage here with more info on numbers seen on bottles.

Another source of confusion was the common practice of engraving the “G” (especially in the 1880-1920 period) to appear very close in similarity to a “C”, the only difference between the two being a small “tail” pointing in a downward or “southeasterly” direction on the lower right-hand side of the letter G. I will occasionally be adding more data to these pages as I uncover more accurate information.

Or better still, send some pictures into the head offices of the companies and ask them if they know.

Maybe an Art Director (from the film industry) might have an idea also, as they sometimes need such things for period movies - there are prop houses full of stuff like this! Pepsi started test marketing the 16 ounce bottle in 1960.

Here are some pictures; Third, is a Rolling Rock pony bottle that I found in a small pile of bottles presumably thrown into the woods when it was used as a "private" landfill.

Fourth here is a small glass/porcelain cup that I really dont know the purpose of. It's four sided at its base and forms into a cylinder top. Here's a bottle, presumably gin, whiskey, or some other hard drink sure to its size and design.

I am striving to add more articles on this site relating to glass and glass collecting, both of a general nature, and addressing certain collecting “niches”, as time and energy permits! If it’s a question that is already answered somewhere on this site, then a *keyword search* will have to suffice (look along the top right-hand area of any page for the search box), and I may not reply with an individual answer.

I apologize if you write to me via email, or post on one of these pages and do not get a personalized reply!

This is very frequently the case, especially with soda, mineral water, beer and other bottles of the 1880-1930 period, in which the initial(s) of the “end user” (such as the bottler, brewery, drug manufacturer, or other firm for which the bottle was made) appear embossed on the base. initials of early glass companies) may vary slightly in appearance and punctuation from one bottle to another. These marks usually served as some type of mold identification, indicating a particular mold used by a glass factory.